dill

Crispy Cauliflower + Homemade Ranch

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As a vegetarian, I have no appetite for a food like chicken. However, I’m not crazy. I like food, and I enjoy the enticing smell of fried chicken. I get a little hungry when the Publix fried chicken commercial comes on [let’s be honest– it’s borderline food porn, which you can view here].

It’s tough to find a vegetarian alternative that really satisfies that craving for something crispy and salty and fatty. This cauliflower recipe certainly does the trick!

When it comes to frying foods, I have always been a huge fan of what my husband and I call SBP (aka Standard Breading Procedure). Anytime we decide to fry something it has always been SBP- dredge in flour, soak in egg, coat in bread crumbs or panko.

This recipe uses a different breading technique, one that leaves you with a crunchy, flaky, and deliciously crisp snack. It is even easier, requiring only two bowls and NO raw egg!

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I am also adding my recipe for homemade ranch. I always keep a large jar of this in my fridge, and it is really easy to make. It’s also MUCH creamier and fresh-flavored than bottled varieties of ranch.

Crispy Cauliflower + Homemade Ranch

Ingredients

for the cauliflower
2 teaspoons garam masala
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon each: garlic powder and paprika
1/4 teaspoon each: onion powder and turmeric
1 cup buttermilk
1 head of cauliflower
1 cup flour  (+1/4 teaspoon kosher salt)
vegetable oil

for the ranch
(makes about 1 cup of ranch dressing)
1/4 cup each: milk, sour cream, and mayonnaise
1/4 teaspoon each: dried parsley, garlic powder, kosher salt, pepper, and Penzey’s mural of flavor*
1/8 teaspoon each: onion powder and dried dill

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To make the ranch dressing, whisk all ingredients in a medium-sized bowl. You can store this in a large mason jar in the fridge. Feel free to adjust the ratios to your taste! I enjoy the herbal quality that Penzey’s mural of flavor spice blend adds, but it isn’t necessary if you don’t have it already in your kitchen!

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For the cauliflower, begin by mixing all the herbs and spices in a large bowl or gallon plastic bag.* Add the buttermilk in and stir thoroughly.

*I used a plastic bread bowl that my grandmother gave to me. It has a top on it, so it is perfect for battering veggies (and rising bread dough).

Next, wash and chop the cauliflower into bite-sized florets. Coat the florets in the buttermilk mixture. I put the lid on the bowl and shook it around, but you can accomplish this with your hands or a spatula. Be sure to generously coat each piece. Then, set this bowl aside, allowing the cauliflower to “marinate”.

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Prepare the oil in a small pot, about 2 inches deep, over medium heat.

In a second bowl, combine the flour with 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Measure out 3 tablespoons of the buttermilk-spice mixture and blend it into the flour until it has a crumbly texture.

Take each, buttermilk-soaked floret and coat it generously in the crumbly flour mixture.

Test if the oil is ready by dropping a bit of batter into the pot. If it sputters and bubbles, it’s time to fry!

Fry the coated florets in batches, replenishing the oil as needed. Give each batch about five minutes to cook the cauliflower and get golden and crispy! Set them aside to cool and drain on a paper towel.

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Serve with ranch as an appetizer, snack, or side. Enjoy!

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Piaju with Dill Raita

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Ramadan is coming to an end soon, but I thought I’d go ahead and post this awesome snack! I know I’m about a month too late, but hey, you can have delicious snacks like this after Ramadan too! From what I’ve read, piaju is a pretty standard snack during this month of fasting. They are excellent because they’re small, but filling. Also, they’re fried and delicious!

I used a basic recipe and then changed it up to make it what I want, so this is by no means a standardized version. Also, when I decided to include a “raita,” I totally made up the recipe, so I can’t promise that it stays true to traditional Indian (or Bangladeshi) cooking. The raita is not vegan, but the piaju are still delicious without it!

piaju

Piaju (also known as dahl pakora) are little fried lentil-onion balls. They function as a snack, but obviously during a time of fasting such as Ramadan they essentially become a meal. The lentils really do fill you up. I will typically have a few piaju and then a small salad as a meal.

This recipe is supposed to make about 20 balls, but the American in me just couldn’t resist supersizing them, so I only got about ten out of it. This was a perfect meal for two people, but they are sharing portions and easy to eat on the go, so you really could serve this up as a party food. It all depends on your circumstances, but the flexibility is great.

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Note: you’ll want a food processor for this recipe.

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Ingredients

for the piaju
3/4 cup dried, red lentils
1/4 teaspoon fresh, grated ginger
3/4 large, yellow onion
1/4 cup cilantro leaves
1/4 serrano pepper
1/2 jalapeño pepper
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon asafoetida

piaju

for the “raita”
1/4 cup plain, Greek yogurt
1 tablespoon minced, fresh dill
1 small clove garlic
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon poppy seeds

lemon slices for serving

piaju

 

First, wash the lentils and soak them in a bowl of hot water for thirty minutes.

While the lentils are soaking, peel and grate the ginger (you’ll want an inch or two of fresh ginger to get 1/4 teaspoon). Put the ginger into your food processor.

Next, chop the onion. I’d recommend chopping it pretty finely, let’s call it diced. You don’t want it to be too thick because the frying will not cook this mixture all the way and raw onion can be strong in large bites. Wash and de-stem the cilantro. You’ll want to chop it a little bit, but it doesn’t need much. Clean and mince the peppers. [I always cover my hands in olive oil when I am doing this, it protects your skin from pepper burns.] Combine the onion, cilantro, peppers, and spices into a large bowl.

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After the lentils are done soaking, rinse them and put them in the food processor with the ginger. Puree these together, until you have a slightly coarse/thick paste.

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I had to work slowly, stopping every now and then to push the paste back to the bottom of the food processor.

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Once that is done, scoop the paste into the large bowl and mix with the cilantro and onions. Now you have your “dough”!

Form the dough into little balls (you can make them whatever size you want). Place them in the freezer for about half an hour.

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While the piaju are chilling, make the raita. Place the yogurt in a small bowl. Rinse, de-stem, and mince the dill. Mince the garlic. Add the dill, garlic, and spices into the yogurt and mix thoroughly. If you like your raita to be less thick, you can also add in a little bit of lemon juice.

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After the raita is made, you can begin prepping your oil for frying the piaju. I used a very tiny pot for this, because I hate frying things. I hate the way it makes the apartment smell, and I hate the mess it creates. Using this small pot helped a lot. We used only 1 1/2 cups of vegetable oil, and had very little odor or splatter. You want the oil to be fairly hot (throw a crumb in and if it begins frying vigorously, you’re good).

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With the hot oil, you’ll want a slotted spoon for placing the piaju in the pot and getting them out. Also have ready a plate with paper towels for draining. We kept our pakora in the freezer and just took them out one at a time for frying and this worked very well.

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When you fry them, a few bits will come off naturally, but don’t worry too much about this. Just keep the oil hot. When you first place the piaju in the pot, you want to move it so it does not get stuck to the bottom, but then just leave it alone! This is difficult, but give it a minute to brown and finish frying, then take it out of the oil and place it on the plate to drain. Repeat this process with each ball, until they are all fried. If you make more, smaller balls, you can fry more than one at a time.

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Serve fresh with raita and enjoy!

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Minestra con pasta e fagioli

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I am exploring a new cookbook, Share: the cookbook that celebrates our common humanity. It was published by Women for Women International, an organization that helps women in war torn countries. Aside from learning about their stories, I’ve found some neat recipes that I never would have tried before.

This book is really fun to flip through because the recipes come not only from the women being helped, but also the women doing the helping. This provides for an interesting look at food around the world– who’s using enriched ingredients, which traditions favor simpler dishes, etc. I hope to make many of these recipes, especially those that are a bit more unique. However, I started off with a hearty stew that pretty much any mediterranean foodie knows: pasta e fagioli.

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Pasta e fagioli is a very traditional, Italian stew (pasta and beans), and I want to talk a little bit about the terminology here. I have labelled this post in particular as minestra. Any students of Italian will naturally question this, because the word that most commonly refers to “soup” is zuppa. The history of these terms is fascinating, and really important in terms of how we should view dishes like these.

In Italian, zuppa refers to a soup with broth and chunks of bread, no pasta. Apparently, the term actually comes from a Gothic word meaning “soaked bread.” On the contrary, my new favorite, minestra, is a soup that does usually involve pasta. Nowadays, this soup is typically considered a first course (not fancy enough to be an entree). However, minestra was originally the main (and only) course given to slaves in ancient times, and the term comes from the Latin ministrāre, ‘to supply.’ (Thanks to this Italian Life for the crash course!)

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Obviously, I geeked out a bit at that! On a more serious note- I don’t believe we need to look at this simple minestra as just a first course. This soup was originally meant to sustain men and women throughout an entire day. It might be vegetarian, but it’s jam-packed with protein and carbs. I “beef” it up a bit by adding in a fabulous herb mixture, but this soup can truly be anything you want it to be. The base is a vegetable broth with pasta and beans. You decide the rest.

Because it’s summer, and I am on a farmer’s market roll, I decided to throw in some seasonal veggies as well. Thankfully, this soup also doesn’t take long (about forty to fifty minutes in all).

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Minestra: pasta e fagioli
serves about 4, as a main course

Ingredients
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 garlic cloves
3/4 large onion
5 small carrots (with stems)
2 ribs celery
14oz can cannellini beans
14oz can diced tomatoes (if you can find San Marzano, bless the town you live in for carrying them and please make use of them!!)
4-5 cups vegetable stock (I use Knorr bouillon cubes, because it’s cheaper)
1/3 cup frozen peas
1 medium zucchini
2 bay leaves
1 cup macaroni

optional for topping
parmesan cheese (leave off for vegan option)
dill, Italian parsley, and carrot-top herb mix
salt and pepper

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The most tedious thing about this recipe is all of the chopping you are going to have to do! (It’s totally worth it though, so don’t let that scare you!)

First, chop the garlic and onion. [Pro-tip: Bring a miniature cutting station to your living room couch and a bunch of tiny bowls. I watched some Mad Men while making this, so I was chopping everything and separating it out before I even approached the stove!]

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Next, chop off the stems of the carrots (but save those leafy greens for later). Peel the carrots and quarter them. Honestly, you can probably get away with just slicing the carrots, but I knew I wanted a softer stew, so I went ahead and cut them into smaller bites. I even added in a big carrot because it seemed like a good amount of orange…I wouldn’t recommend it, because it ended up leaving me with little broth and LOTS of stuff in my soup! In the end, it will be delicious anyway.

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Trim and chop the celery, adding it into the bowl with the carrots.

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In a large pot, heat up the olive oil and add in the garlic and onions.

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After about a minute, add in the carrots and celery. Make sure you stir everything a bit so that the onions do not overcook at the bottom of the pot.

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Let this cook for about five minutes. During this time you need to rinse and drain the cannellini beans, and prepare your five cups of broth. Drop two or three cubes of Knorr bouillon into 5 cups of boiling water and stir until the cubes have dissolved. If you are using pre-made broth, you’ve saved yourself some time (and an extra pot)!

When the carrots are tender but still have their color, add the beans, diced tomatoes, and broth into the pot. This mixture needs to simmer for about twenty minutes.

During this time you can: watch more Mad Men, finely slice a zucchini (if you want to add that), and chop up your herb mixture.

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For my herb mixture, I used 1/4 cup dill, 1/2 cup Italian parsley, and the stems from my carrots! I washed them all and bunched them all together and chopped them. This was hastily done because I was hungry for soup, so you could probably mince them carefully and separately and it would be fancy and beautiful, but that’s not really what minestra is about, so I say just go for it and slow down just to enjoy the flavors at the end!

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After the twenty minutes is up, add in the peas, zucchini, bay leaves, and pasta. Stir everything together really well, and leave it to simmer for another ten minutes.

Next, serve each bowl with a heaping pile of fresh herbs and Parmesan. Add some salt and pepper to the top for taste.

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Enjoy!

 

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Bomb-Ass Potato Salad

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I call this bomb-ass potato salad, because I know that nobody will be interested in making or eating it if I title this post “vegan potatoes.” Bleh. Whenever people hear the word vegan, they walk the other way! Let’s just say that this is a dish that just so happens to be vegan, but you can easily sub regular mayo for the vegenaise and add bacon bits to make it carnivore-friendly! I think it’s nice to make available a sneaky vegan dish like this, because at picnics and other large gatherings there will always be friends and family with dietary restrictions- and we want everyone to enjoy the food together, so why not make it inclusive?

This is a great recipe that we discovered while on the Daniel Fast. It’s a vegan potato salad that is sooo tasty! The celery gives it a nice crunch, the potatoes a good creamy texture, and the dill and mustard provide bright flavors! It works well with veggies but can also be good on crackers. I have never put potato salad on a sandwich before, but I don’t see why you couldn’t! It is a great recipe for BBQ’s and picnics that is yummy, but also accessible because, as I said, anyone with dietary restrictions is likely to be able to enjoy it.

There are so many ways to get creative with this one; I would highly recommend that you taste it along the way to get the exact flavor you like! Plus, getting a little snack in makes the cooking process more fun!

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Potato Salad

(makes about 5 servings)

Ingredients
2 pounds red potatoes
2 stalks celery
1 tablespoon minced, fresh parsley
1/2 cup minced, fresh dill
juice from 1/2 a lemon
2 tablespoons vegan mayo
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
kosher salt and pepper to taste

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First, scrub those potatoes clean and put them up in a pot of salted, boiling water. You want to boil them, skin-on, until a fork slides easily through (let’s call it 10 minutes, though it might take a bit longer).

Cube the potatoes and throw them into a large bowl. I like to keep the skin on because I love having potato skins in my potato salad, but if you’d rather lose them- peel the potatoes first!

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Wash and slice the celery, adding it into the potatoes.

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Wash and mince the parsley and dill. Throw those in with the potatoes.

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Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mix.

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Finally, mix in the mayo and mustard. You can also add salt and pepper to taste, I recommend about 1/2 a teaspoon of each (but you should taste test before you throw it all in there, unless you know that you like salty foods!).

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Serve with crackers, vegetables, or even bread!

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Enjoy!

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Vegan Matzo Ball Soup

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What can  I say about this soup? It is better than chicken noodle at comforting a tired soul and aching body. It is one of those soups that, when you take your first sip, you really can taste your momma’s love. In every recipe, you can see that this soup has stood the test of time. It has a few variations depending on whose grandma’s recipe you’re exploring, but the basics are always there.

This is a homemade vegetable broth (read: vegetables stewed with water). It is so clearly one of those dishes that has such an incredible history to it, and when I eat it I feel that. Obviously, as an historian I am probably biased. So, when you take your first sip you might not feel the spark, the connection, the tug on the line in your gut that ties you to the thousands and millions and billions of people that have come before you, walked this earth, and used nature to nourish themselves. I feel that. It’s pretty dang awesome.

Buuuut even if you don’t feel that feeling, you will feel like you’re back at home, on your mother’s couch, enjoying the sweet, healing comfort that only moms can give. For me, it’s reminiscent of Campbell’s Noodle O’s and a nice, crisp Sprite. For many others- it will actually be reminiscent of matzo ball soup.

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Jewish culinary heritage is one of those things that makes me swoon. I am not Jewish, and I did not have much contact with these types of foods growing up. However, many of these recipes are legitimate old world recipes that can be really easily adapted for vegetarian consumption, because back then we didn’t have easy access to factory farmed meats all the time.

In particular, matzo ball soup was really easy to adapt for the Daniel Fast. To me, this appears to be no coincidence. The origin of the fast comes from the book of Daniel, when Daniel and his friends have been captured and taken to Babylon. There, they are taught to follow Babylonian customs (many of which conflict with the laws of Judaism). Daniel chooses to change his diet drastically while there. He receives only vegetables to eat and water to drink. While living in the king’s court as a servant, he makes the choice not to partake of any royal foods or extravagant meals. Considering the Jewish origins of matzo ball soup, it seemed the perfect dish to make and eat as a part of our fast!

We did need to make a few alterations to the recipes, in order to make them fully compliant with the guidelines of the fast. We need to take out the typical egg as the binding agent in the matzo balls, and also remove any leavening agents in the matzo meal/ matzo balls. This means that the matzo balls for this recipe fall apart very easily. You want to be extra careful while cooking them for this reason!

 

Vegan Matzo Ball Soup

makes about 5 servings of matzo ball soup, with some veggie broth left over

Ingredients

for the broth

5 medium carrots
5 celery stalks
1 leek
1 yellow onion
1 small bunch + 2 tablespoons fresh dill
1 small bunch Italian parsley
5 garlic cloves
1 pinch Spanish saffron
3 bay leaves
10-15 whole peppercorns
1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
16 cups water

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for the matzo balls

2 gold potatoes
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon seltzer water
1/2 cup matzo meal (check the ingredients to make sure it is unleavened)
1 tablespoon + 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 tablespoon fresh, minced dill
1 pinch Spanish saffron
12 cups water

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Step one is going to be to make the vegetable broth. This will make a TON of broth, which is great because it’s cheap and freezes very well. You can also use it as a base for many other kinds of soups, if you like. First, take out the biggest pot you have! A pasta pot is ideal for this.

Peel and chop the carrots.

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Wash and finely chop the celery. Make sure you chop the leaves as well, you want to include every part of the celery for the broth!

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Take apart the leek and clean it very carefully. Leeks can get a ton of dirt caught up in them, so you do want to be very careful especially if you buy organic.

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matzo ball soup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chop the onion in half, but keep the skin on! Clean the dill bunch, and chop an additional 2 tablespoons of dill.

Add the carrot, celery, leek, onion, and dill to the pot.

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Wash and destem the Italian parsley and add it into the pot.

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Next, add in the garlic (peeled), saffron, bay leaves, peppercorns, and salt.

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Finally, add in the olive oil and the water!

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Heat the mixture up to a boil, and then reduce to a simmer for 90 minutes. After it is done cooking, pour the broth over a strainer into a large bowl. You need to pick the celery and carrots out of the cooked vegetables in the strainer and add them back into the large bowl of broth. This part is not really fun, and it’s kind of tedious, but if you have someone helping you, it shouldn’t take too long.

 

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After you have “reassembled” the broth, you can just keep warm it on the stove until you’re ready to eat!

 

 

 

Step two is to make the matzo balls. First wash the potatoes and boil them in a pot of salt water until they are very tender. Once they are done, remove them form the water and mash them in a bowl.

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Whisk together the mashed potatoes with the olive oil and seltzer water. Add in the matzo meal, 1/4 teaspoon of the kosher salt, garlic powder, onion powder, and minced dill.

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Mash everything together to form a ball, and refrigerate it for 45 minutes.

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After the matzo dough has refrigerated, hand-shape ten smaller balls. The dough will be a bit sticky, so you can dip your hands in water to help manage this while you are forming the balls.

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Set 12 cups of water on the stove to boil, and add in the remaining tablespoon of kosher salt and  a pinch of saffron. While the water is heating up, keep the matzo balls refrigerated. This amount of constant refrigeration will really help them stay together during the cooking.

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With the water at a simmer, gently drop the matzo balls in and cover the pot. For ten minutes, leave the pot covered and then gently take the matzo balls out with a slotted spoon. You want to place them carefully on a plate after cooking, you will notice how fragile they are. If you are not going to eat the soup immediately do not put them in the broth. After they have cooled down, you can bag them up and freeze them for later.

 

If you are going to go ahead and eat them, dole out some of the broth into a few bowls and drop the matzo balls in!

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Enjoy!

matzo ball soup

Homemade Pickles

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Pickles are great, they are good on sandwiches and on burgers and alone as a side! You can even fry them up like I did here for a great, Southern snack! They’re classic in a deliciously, vinegar-y, salty way. I bet you’ve always just bought them at the store and thought nothing of it. But, the fun thing about making your own pickles is that you get to be really creative! You can really mess with the ratios of flavors and add different ingredients to your pickles to make them just how you like them. We experimented heavily, and so this “recipe” is more of a rough outline for the things you can do when making homemade pickles! We added in some jalapeños to flavor the cucumber and now we have pickled peppers too!

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I really like the classic dill flavor, and I also enjoy a stronger vinegar flavor, so I used fresh dill and a 1:1 water, vinegar ratio. This takes about a week to pickle, instead of the typical 3 days, in order for the vinegar flavor to become mild enough to enjoy.  You can also try dill seed, it will add a stronger dill flavor that is more typical of dill pickles!

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Making homemade pickles also means that you can cut the cucumbers in any way you like and that you can eat them at any stage in the pickling process! If you plan to experiment with under-pickled cucumbers (cucumbers that are still bright green, crunchy, and have a bit of that fresh flavor, but are slightly pickled in brine), I would recommend that you lower the ratio of vinegar to water.

 

Homemade Pickles
Makes enough for 4, 16oz jars

 

Ingredients

3 pounds Persian cucumbers
2 cups vinegar (I used white vinegar, but many people use cider vinegar)
2 cups water
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon sugar
4, 16 ounce mason jars with sealable lids

 

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optional flavors

For fresh, dill pickles
4 garlic cloves, cleaned and diced
4 green onions, white part chopped, green stalk saved for later use
16 fronds fresh dill
8 teaspoons dill seed
4 tablespoons whole coriander seeds
4 teaspoons rainbow peppercorn (whole)

 

pickles

 

For “bread ‘n’ butter” spicy pickles
8 fronds fresh dill
4 garlic cloves, cleaned and diced
4 green onions, whites chopped, green stalk saved for later use
4 tablespoons hot sauce
4 tablespoons rainbow peppercorn (whole)
2 jalapeños, sliced
4 tablespoons honey

 

pickles

 

My favorite pickles were the spicy, bread and butter pickles, but it is something you can experiment with each time you make them!

 

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Begin by cleaning the cucumbers and cutting off the stems. Then, you can chop them however you like!

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I like both spears and slices, so we made a variety!

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Next, set the vinegar, water, kosher salt, and sugar on the stove to boil. This will be your brine. Stir it occasionally to make sure that the salt and sugar are dissolving into the liquid.

 

While the brine is heating up, prepare your jars! You can divide up the ingredients equally between each jar, as I have them listed, or you can get creative and make your own ratios!

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Arrange the ingredients into each jar.

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Next, stuff in the cucumber! Be careful how you arrange them, sometimes they can be hard to fit and you definitely want enough room for them to sink into the flavors at the bottom!

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After the brine reaches a rolling boil, pour it over the the contents of each jar and seal the jars. I recommend labelling the jars if you are planning on making different types to experiment with. It is good to know which ratios are in each jar, and sometimes it is difficult to tell after the pickling!

 

Store them in the refrigerator for at least three days before eating! Once they have pickled, open them up and enjoy!

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pickles

 

 

Dill and Garlic Egg White Scramble

scrambleI was inspired to post this recipe because I absolutely hate wasting egg whites, and there is just no way around the fact that the best lava cake recipe calls for 3 egg yolks. I’m never gonna stop making that recipe, so my solution: find a delicious way to use those egg whites!

Luckily, breakfast food is my favorite category of foods. I love biscuits and bagels and croissants. Soy breakfast meats are delicious, as are breakfast potatoes (oh, the many kinds of breakfast potatoes-YUM). I even like pancakes and waffles every now and then. As a result, it was natural for me to want to use those egg whites for a yummy, weekend brunch!

For starters, I actually had to use the egg whites from 6 eggs to make a 2 serving scramble. For those of you who are planning to make this after lava cakes, just plan for only a 1 serving scramble the morning after! For those of you who are not making this recipe after having made lava cakes and would like to include the yolks, I really think you should add a little bit of milk in with the scramble before you cook it. Egg whites by themselves are amazing because they are so so fluffy even without the addition of milk (plus they’re way healthier). If you make it with the full egg, the added milk will help give them that fluffiness that is so pretty and delicious in scrambled eggs!

Dill and Garlic Egg White Scramble
Makes one serving

Ingredients
3 egg whites
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic (about 1 small clove)
1/2 tablespoon chopped, fresh dill
1/2 tablespoon chopped, fresh parsley (I use Italian parsley)
1/8 cup chopped yellow onion (about 1/4 of an onion)
4 tablespoons minced, tri-colored bell peppers
1/2 campari tomato, chopped
1/2 cup of cheese (Italian blend or Mexican mix are my favorites)
several dashes of cayenne and paprika
3 tablespoons olive oil
kosher salt and pepper to taste

ew scrambleWhisk together the egg whites, garlic, dill, parsley, onion, bell peppers, and tomatoes. The mixture will be a little foamy but fairly thick, this is good! Then, mix in the cheese, cayenne, and paprika.

ew scrambleIn a skillet, let the olive oil get warm over medium heat and then pour in the egg mixture. You want it to be fairly warm, so that the eggs sizzle a bit when you pour them in.

ew scrambleThe sizzling will produce a nice crispy bottom and the eggs will really fluff up and cook quickly.

After a minute or two, check underneath the eggs to make sure they’re browning. Once they’ve become a little browned, flip them. Let the other side cook, and take them off before they are fully done because eggs tend to cook a little more on their own on the plate. Add kosher salt and pepper as you like!

I made this scramble with toasted everything bagels, soy sausage, and home-fried fennel potatoes, but it is so good and filling on its own that you don’t really need to have all that extra stuff.

ew scramble

Enjoy!